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Effective Arguing Techniques

Updated: Dec 5, 2020


Effective arguing techniques are important because communication skills are an essential part of succeeding in the workforce. They are especially important for women who face significant obstacles in navigating male-dominated fields. Communication skills, especially being able to argue effectively, can be great assets in not only ensuring we are taken seriously but that our voices and opinions are considered. The first tip for improving your arguing techniques is preparation. A clear argument should be developed, and supported by facts. Logic rules can also be useful here. Simple ones, such as if A=B and B=C then A=C. An example of this would be me attempting to argue that How to Get Away With Murder is the best modern day show. I would say that if HTGAWM contains diversity, intricate and compelling plot lines, and deals with important modern issues, and these are all the makings of a great modern show; it is a great contender for best modern show. The second tip is clarity. Sticking to your point is crucial in maintaining a good argument. If necessary, concede, but never contradict yourself. It is better to admit you are wrong, which shows maturity, than to reveal an improper argument. Tip three is considering the opposing argument, which will not only prepare a debater for rebuttals, but allows one to further develop their own argument. For example, “but HTGAWM gets boring.” On the contrary, it actually has the unique ability to have plot lines as ever complex and intriguing in the first season as the last. Its masterful use of flash forwards to deal with mystery keeps audiences on the edge of their seats. The final tip concerns dealing with ignorance. This is unfortunately something that we have to deal with as women. There are ways to handle this, however, without having to sacrifice your credibility as a debater. When dealing with micro aggressions, ask for clarification. This forces the transgressor to admit their own ignorance. The same applies if they lack a foundation for their claim.


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